Eye Candy


The beginning of this week was spent installing the holiday merchandise & displays at Columbia Winery. While there is a plethora of wonderful merchandise to be found there, I just adore this display. It easily wins my 'Best in Show' prize this year (even if I did do it myself!)

The pine tables and hutch all match, making them effectively disappear so that the products stand out. I took a garland, ran it diagonally to create energy, fluffed it up with happy ribbon swirls, and then gathered up all of the glass vases, pedestals, bowls, and domes in the shop and brought them to this area to use as props. That way, the glass helps to create the 'candy shop' theme and adds sparkle, but the real focus is on the products. I hung a few of the giant bells overhead, too.

The merchandise is from Seasons of Cannon Falls, and it's all red flocked velvet jingle bells and rhinestone pins & bell necklaces. I placed the merchandise under the domes, heaped in the vases, lying on the cake pedestals to show it off - it's definitely eye candy! I also added a line of peppermint-twist candles and the Mary Lake Thompson candy cane linens (not seen in these shots) because they fit the theme.

When the Christmas candy order arrives at the beginning of next month, those items (candy canes, lollipops, candy cane wwreaths, etc) will all go into this area, as well. I just wanted to take all of this luscious stuff home and decorate with it - even tho when I use red in my tiny Cottage, it makes the rooms seem OH so small. Ah well.

Photos of other displays later!

3 comments:

  1. I LOVE IT!! You are right this is a Best In Display. I"d love to know where you found the glass domes and the bell wreaths. I think this could easily translate to a dining room centerpiece.

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  2. Oh, lovely and inspiring! Just what this tired little shopkeeper needed to see this morning, too!

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  3. lI love it! the trees are very pretty too! You do a beautiful job!

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my take on retail visual design:

"The thing is, retail design is driven by psychology. It is by manipulating space, visuals, lighting, sound, smell, and mood that we influence customers to enter, stay, browse, buy, and return. It is an endless exercise in change, endurance, growth, education, and imagination that enables retailers to stay on top of their game and at the forefront of their customer's minds. Yes, what you sell IS important - but even the very best merchandise won't sell at full price if it's presented in torn boxes on dirty shelves in a store that is too crowded to turn around in. Visual impact is a huge part of business, and utilizing the principles that have been proven to work can help you build a better business." ~ DWK