Successful Antique Show Booth Design

In June, 2009, I presented a seminar to vendors selling their wares 
at an antique show in the Pacific Northwest.
After providing LOADS of information in a fast-paced 45-minute presentation, 

I provided the vendors with handouts filled with everything I spoke about [and more] 
so that they could refer to it later.


A few years ago, I made that handout available here on my retail design blog.
Since it's always helpful for vintage and antique vendors to learn 
the principles of visual merchandising and display in a way that directly relates to their industry,
I am happy to share the information with you again!

 Click the 'read more' link for more info...

The document includes the following topics:
* space layout and where to place your displays for maximum visual impact 
* where to put the cash register/wrap counter
* using color and scale for visual impact  
* how to come up with a theme for your booth at a show
* tips on styling displays of one-of-a-kind merchandise 
* ideas for creating huge theatrical presentations
...and much more!


The information that I am sharing is for you to view and use 
in the practice of your own business only.
I am happy to share my experience and knowledge with you,

but ask that you respect my copyright on this original material.

 Please do not print and distribute more copies of it.
Please do not sell or use it as content on your own blog or web site or in your book, seminar or store.
You may not in any way profit financially or via the press from the use of my material.
To do so is to violate my copyright.

Feel free to link to this post (click here to copy direct link to post)
but NOT DIRECTLY TO THE DOCUMENT.  
I want people to read these use guidelines before viewing the document. 

My presentation is available here

thank you, and I wish you all a great show season!


Since 1975, I've been a retail display stylist.
From 2007 to 2011, I created displays for my own business in the vintage industry,
where I participated as RETREAT [with my late husband] as a vendor 
in some of the best shows in the country
[Farm Chicks, BarnHouse, Remnants of the Past]

and others, as well as our own Retreat shows held on our farm in Washington state.

Photos above are of RETREAT's booths at:

BarnHouse Antique Show . July 2011 . Battle Ground / Vancouver, Washington
Remnants of the Past Antique Show . May 2010 .  Nipomo, California
 Faded Elegance Antique Mall . June 2010 . Snohomish, Washington
Sand Point Antique and Design Market . September 2010 . Seattle, Washington
UrbanBarn Vintage Flea Market . July 2010 . Escondido, California
Retreat Vintage Marketplace . June 2011 . Camano Island, Washington

[ all images copyright Debi Ward Kennedy / debkennedyimages ]

6 comments:

  1. Those are great tips Debi. I wish I had them years ago when I did Christmas shows with my tole painting.
    It is very generous of you to share them.

    ReplyDelete
  2. i like this a lot for my store....i know the great displays are part art and the artists eye and hard to put into words..........i do pretty goood but then my arty daughter can fluff for a few minutes and WOW its up a grade.... .
    thanks for such helpful points...

    ReplyDelete
  3. Ann, you've made a good point: this information is also helpful for antique malls and retail stores.

    I geared it toward show booths, but the basic principles of retail visual merchandising apply no matter what the setting! Thank you so much for your comments.

    ReplyDelete
  4. You are so generous to share your expertise.
    Merci Beaucoup!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Oh - THANK YOU SO MUCH!!! I am doing a "repeat" show in March and have been trying to "re-set" my booth area - your tips are priceless to me...THANK YOU for sharing them!!!

    ;-)
    robelyn

    ReplyDelete

my take on retail visual design:

"The thing is, retail design is driven by psychology. It is by manipulating space, visuals, lighting, sound, smell, and mood that we influence customers to enter, stay, browse, buy, and return. It is an endless exercise in change, endurance, growth, education, and imagination that enables retailers to stay on top of their game and at the forefront of their customer's minds. Yes, what you sell IS important - but even the very best merchandise won't sell at full price if it's presented in torn boxes on dirty shelves in a store that is too crowded to turn around in. Visual impact is a huge part of business, and utilizing the principles that have been proven to work can help you build a better business." ~ DWK