Bewitched, Bothered, and Bewildered


It's been awhile (oh, say, since December???) since I've been into the Columbia Winery shop to fuss with displays. Ever since the announcement in December that they are moving from the current facility to a newly-designed (by yours truly) one nearby, things there have been in a state of flux, to put it mildly. Merchandise & fixtures have all been moved, sold off, and thinned out in preparation for the 'big move' - which was to have taken place in April. Call me 'Bewildered'.

Yeah, well, not.so.much.
Corporate policy and rigamarole being what it is, legal stalled and then project approval stalled and then negociations stalled and then the decision was made to stay where they are until September. Or maybe October. Or December. The new facility is going nowhere fast...day by day we wait to hear something. Have I mentioned that I really don't like waiting???? This would be the 'Bothered' part.

This past week, the retail director called me and asked if I could wave my magic wand and make the nearly empty space look inviting again. She had ordered a few products and needed my help. So, in I went. Cue the 'Bewitched' theme song...(that's my phone ringer and ringback tone, so everyone calls it my theme song. 'Cause I work magic...get it?)

Holly and I spent two hours moving, unpacking, clearing, refilling, and trying to expand the meager fixtures & props left in the joint to have visual impact. Color makes the displays pop, and the empty....ah, I mean 'open'....space actually makes them stand out quite well. There's a clear viewpoint to all of them!

A few up-close product shots:

Love Rosanna. Love everything she creates. Just brilliant packaging, too - easily worked into a display. (So few products have pretty packaging) Note the olive tree prop, to make the olive branch art on the plates sing. And that green recycled glass? Oh so 'of the moment'.

These dipping oils and vinegars stack together - FABulous. A shot of red from the table, pottery & flowers makes the pasta & sauce stand out. Pop the big piece of art under the table, because this is what you see when you walk in the door - it makes a bigger statement. Simple, but effective.

This is quite a different look that what the shop has been for the past five years I've been designing the displays. It's not bad, just different. Spare, clean, and much less in the way of home accessories. It's truly all about the wine now. And that, my friends, is worth a toast!

Now, two things about my theme song:
First, No, I haven't yet figured out how to wiggle my nose as cutely as Samantha Stevens (whether she is Elizabeth Montgomery or Nicole Kidman) does - but I'm working on it.

Second, Kelly Ripa needs to stop using my music in her appliance commercials.
I don't need to be 'even more amazing' thankyouverymuchKellysizezeroRipa. Every time that commercial comes on, I think it's my phone ringing. Drives me crazy!

2 comments:

  1. oooh Colombia Winery makes my favorite wine Cellarmaster's Riesling. Where is their shop? guess i could go on line and search huh? anyway I have found some very fun blogs tonight and yours is one.
    from the other side of Washington
    peggyann

    ReplyDelete
  2. Peggyann, the Columbia Wine shop is located in Woodinville, right across the street from the Chateau Ste. Michelle Winery and in front of the new Januik Winery.(so, lots of great wine tasting opportunities nearby!) All are easily accessed from I-405 or Hwy. 522.

    I'm so glad you found my blog!

    ReplyDelete

my take on retail visual design:

"The thing is, retail design is driven by psychology. It is by manipulating space, visuals, lighting, sound, smell, and mood that we influence customers to enter, stay, browse, buy, and return. It is an endless exercise in change, endurance, growth, education, and imagination that enables retailers to stay on top of their game and at the forefront of their customer's minds. Yes, what you sell IS important - but even the very best merchandise won't sell at full price if it's presented in torn boxes on dirty shelves in a store that is too crowded to turn around in. Visual impact is a huge part of business, and utilizing the principles that have been proven to work can help you build a better business." ~ DWK