Retail ReDesign, Phase Three

Today we undertook Phase Three at Poppyseeds: another interior room inside the cottage. The two owners and I quickly discussed the ideas I had for a new theme, and then we started emptying the room of everything small. Above, you can see the view immediately inside the doorway BEFORE. Great products and terrific props & fixtures, which are placed a bit too close to the doorway, but there is not focal point from this very important spot. And that warm poppy red wall is just screaming for attention...
AFTER, the view straight into the room is now one that draws us into the space. Stairstepped pieces along the left wall offer levels for products. The tall cabinet acts as a visual bridge, connecting the vignette between the wall display and in front of the window. Placing a large red shelf over the window continues the color from the left wall into the room.
Another view (from across the room) of the same area, BEFORE.
...and AFTER. We keep the 'windows' open and uncluttered, so that customers can view this area from the front room on the other side.
The display area in front of the window, BEFORE. Lots of furniture, color, and detail. The mirror in the window is blocking a lot of light, and also preventing those outside from seeing in. This window is the focal point from the very popular restaurant across the street, so maximizing visual impact in this window display is very important. It needs to 'read well' from both inside AND outside.
The same area, AFTER. Sunlight pours in the window, lighting up the room and making everything sparkle. White furniture and red & aqua accessories and props express the vintage beach cottage theme we were going for. We kept all of the smaller products on the hutch, and placed only larger ones on the table - to keep the look clean and orderly. The same display, AFTER, viewed from the opposite side.
To the right side of the window, BEFORE, there is a windowed wall that separates this room from another. In this shot, you can't even tell it's glass because it is blocked on both sides. That green dressing table is the only piece of furniture that was removed from the room... everything else stayed.
AFTER, the glass is not only visible, but it allows even more light to come from the back room's windows. The red dressser pulls the wall color to this side of the room, as do the umbrella props. The table and four chairs and a chest (seen beneath the table) are the new pieces of furniture brought into the room.... there are now MORE pieces in this room than when we began, but by using space wisely (and vertically), the room is more spacious and easier to shop.
BEFORE, when you entered the room and looked right, this was the view. Visually, there is no focal point. This crate was removed from the room, and will be painted to appear in another room later.
AFTER, the view to the right is open, airy, bright, and shows off the products. The vintage stove moved into the corner and now provides many levels for merchandising. The wall cabinet now appears as a part of the whole vignette, instead of floating on its own.
View from the windowed side of the room shows the mirror that previously blocked the window. It now reflects light & views, making the room seem wider. Chairs stacked on table & stove top maximize vertical space and again offer levels for other products. Red paper lantern props add red color above. Another AFTER shot:Vintage-look linens, aprons, and dinnerware in white, red, aqua, and yellow fit right in with the theme, and are placed in an area with plenty of room for customers to browse. There is a red coffee table tucked beneath the stove - it's another piece that was added to this room.

In all, there are three tables, nine chairs, one desk, one hutch, one stove, one trunk, one dresser, and various stools, two lamps, one chandelier, and dozens of small accessories in this 9 X 9 space. It feels and appears bigger, brighter, and less cluttered than when we began. ANd two customers who walked in during the rearranging commented 'Oh! Look at all the NEW STUFF!' It's not. There's not one single thing in this room that wasn't already in the store (except the umbrella & paper lantern props). It's just combined in a fresh new way... and customers were inspired. Design can do that!

Time invested, start to finish: 3 1/2 hours. Money spent: Zero. Final Effect: Priceless!

3 comments:

  1. Wonderful, amazing, fantastic transformation! They really have cool stuff!

    Linda & Dixie
    The Funky Junk Sisters

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hi there Debi,

    first, your merchandising is positively delicious! Come do my home . . . puleeez :o)

    and (second) thanks for popping into my little ol' creative neck of the woods - your words are appreciated. Happy day to ya!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Bravo! Fantastic as usual. I am going to try and remember to document my rearranging more and blog about it. You are always an inspiration. kath

    ReplyDelete

my take on retail visual design:

"The thing is, retail design is driven by psychology. It is by manipulating space, visuals, lighting, sound, smell, and mood that we influence customers to enter, stay, browse, buy, and return. It is an endless exercise in change, endurance, growth, education, and imagination that enables retailers to stay on top of their game and at the forefront of their customer's minds. Yes, what you sell IS important - but even the very best merchandise won't sell at full price if it's presented in torn boxes on dirty shelves in a store that is too crowded to turn around in. Visual impact is a huge part of business, and utilizing the principles that have been proven to work can help you build a better business." ~ DWK