Displays: Spring Forward

 There are so many images on Pinterest that show the re-use of old items in new ways.
Architectural salvage and everyday materials are being used in imaginative displays, 
the best of them building the brand of the business along with selling products.

This is the case with the images shown here...
I snapped them on Monday, at Rogers Gardens in Newport Beach, California.
This garden and home decor company is a leader in retail visual merchandising...
I am always inspired and intrigued when I visit.
 The images here are of a display located along the entry walk... outside of the business.
By simply using old wood flower crates, window shutters, and doors,
then filling them with plants and pots, 
an interesting view is created for approaching customers.
 It takes up very little physical space, draws the eye in and upward, 
and since it can be changed seasonally, it can always be a fresh representation 
of what awaits inside. Perfectly simple.

Inside the store, there are dozens of rooms and gardens and terraces,
expertly filled with product and inspiring displays.
One area display utilizes old window frames, hung against a brightly-hued painted wall.
The graphic effect is fresh, clean, and attracts the eye - 
and the pots, plants, and twig-motif lanterns are set off perfectly.

It says 'Spring!' and inspires a party, an entryway decor, a tablescape.
Spring is about growth, life, green, white, freshness... perfectly captured here.
These are ideas that you can easily utilize in your own store or showroom,
using materials that are readily available at local vintage, shops, shows, or salvage yards.
Or, as in the case of the crates, in your own shed!

Have fun and Spring Forward!

1 comment:

  1. Hi Debbie,
    It's amazing to me that something old and worn can be absolutely stunning:) I just wish I had a store big enough to display things like this. With just 240 sq. ft. I'm unable to use one wall for a display like that ;(

    Oh well, your posts still inspire me to try something on a smaller scale.

    Thanks for all you do,
    Sherry Campbell,
    Sherry's on Main

    ReplyDelete

my take on retail visual design:

"The thing is, retail design is driven by psychology. It is by manipulating space, visuals, lighting, sound, smell, and mood that we influence customers to enter, stay, browse, buy, and return. It is an endless exercise in change, endurance, growth, education, and imagination that enables retailers to stay on top of their game and at the forefront of their customer's minds. Yes, what you sell IS important - but even the very best merchandise won't sell at full price if it's presented in torn boxes on dirty shelves in a store that is too crowded to turn around in. Visual impact is a huge part of business, and utilizing the principles that have been proven to work can help you build a better business." ~ DWK