Disney's Magic Display Style

Today I was reading an article about the Walt Disney Company's 2013 retail successes,
- Read it HERE on the Walt Disney Company blog -
and I came across the image above.

Obviously, this image depicts displays of Disney brand merchandise...

NOT so obvious to many may be the WAY the merchandise is presented.
Let me point out a few important things:

(after the jump!)

1. A Brand-Centric Environment Design

This area is defined by the wall treatment visible ABOVE the merchandise area:
the wallpaper with a distinctive Mickey Mouse Ear graphic pattern.
It's in pale tones - white, gray, possibly metallic silver - so it isn't the thing that catches your eye first.
This detail simply adds another layer of brand identity and familiarity to the scene.

That brand-centric design isn't all subtle. It extends to
the red 'DISNEY' logo sign.
It's prominently placed in the center of the area's entry, over the main feature display.
It's bright red - in contrast to everything around it so that it really stands out.
You can't miss it!
If Mike Wazowski's big ol' eye wasn't already a dead giveaway, 
now you KNOW that this is Disney merchandise.

2. Neutral Surroundings + Fixtures

Every fixture in this shot is white.
The wall built ins? White. The movable low slatwall units? White.
The freestanding tables? White. 
By coordinating all of the fixtures, they effectively disappear.
The ceiling is white. The flooring is a light neutral color.
Nothing competes for visual attention here...

...and that accomplishes one very important visual goal:

3. The products become the FOCUS

The vibrant colors of every item POP against the white background and white fixtures.
Nothing muddies them up, confuses the eye of the viewer, 
or causes a color pairing that is anything but complimentary.
Customers can see items much more clearly in a setting like this.

Adding to the clarity is the groupings of merchandise...
Each fixture holds a collection of products in one theme and one colorway.
Not only does this keep the look neat and crisp,
it also makes it easy for customers to shop AND for employees to re-stock the displays.

Now, according to the image name from the Disney blog,
this image depicts a Disney merchandise area inside a JC Penney store.
This one line of products has created a completely brand-focused area 
inside someone else's store.
 
They've built on the company foundation of storytelling in a visual way.
[ and haven't I been telling you for years that you gotta' Tell Your Own Story?!]

You can do this, too!  No matter what you sell, 
those are basic visual merchandising tips that work for EVERYONE.
No magic required ;)

image credit: Walt Disney Company blog
[https://thewaltdisneycompany.com/blog/storytelling-heart-inspiration-disney-consumer-products-2013]

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my take on retail visual design:

"The thing is, retail design is driven by psychology. It is by manipulating space, visuals, lighting, sound, smell, and mood that we influence customers to enter, stay, browse, buy, and return. It is an endless exercise in change, endurance, growth, education, and imagination that enables retailers to stay on top of their game and at the forefront of their customer's minds. Yes, what you sell IS important - but even the very best merchandise won't sell at full price if it's presented in torn boxes on dirty shelves in a store that is too crowded to turn around in. Visual impact is a huge part of business, and utilizing the principles that have been proven to work can help you build a better business." ~ DWK