Bloomin' Displays at a Garden Retailer

Springtime always brings out the need to focus on mother nature... 
here are great examples of Spring Fresh displays, found at a garden retailer,
sure to inspire your own window and store displays:

 
 
Yeah, that's a truck - an old, rusty farm truck. 
(Probably gave out right where it sits!) 
But surrounded by tables of potted spring flowers, and filled with dirt and tulips, 
it becomes an instant eye-grabbing display fixture. 
This is a garden center, with big buildings and lots of land - 
they have to go BIG with visuals for impact. 
This is a perfect prop for the entrance display!

...and just WAIT until you see what they did INSIDE the store!

Inside the Garden Store? Another truck! 
This one is older, but has been meticulously cleaned up. 
(Meaning it is old and rusty, but not dirty or cobwebby. Old is good. Cruddy is NOT.) 
It forms the 'draw' to a large display area filled with flower bulbs. 
Old crates are stacked up to bring the bulbs up to shopper height, 
and they are very appropriate props for this product because just a few miles away, 
these same crates are used during the harvest of thousands of tulips and tulip bulbs.

Notice also the varied windows hanging above and behind the truck... 
this adds interest to the bare space up above. 
There is a lot of great 'arial' (overhead) display work in this shop. 
It all utilizes simple materials, but serves the purpose to direct attention to this area - even from a distance. 
I love the light, airy, open feel of the displays and the floorplan here. 
To the left of that truck, there is this display. 

The FABulous window frames in the rear of this display 
were actually cut from the walls of an old house with a chainsaw - there is still siding attached! 
They stand 10' tall and are a great backdrop for the tall racks filled with vegetable and flower seeds.

The paint color on the window frames is a pale gray-white, 
so the foreground props are in a soft gray color to coordinate. 
Large flower seed packets fill the bin up front...this display is excellent
It pulls you in with detail, offers product prominently and with easy access, 
and there is plenty of room for several customers to move around.

You all know my penchant for using natural elements in displays - 
they have impact and they are usually free! 
These birch trees add height, scale, and a fairytale forest effect to this space...
I'd bet they are actually branches trimmed from huge trees on the property. 
And, since this IS a nursery, they are again a very appropriate prop. 
Effective, impact-producing, and versatile.... do props get any better than this?!


Be still my heart. OK, so the shelf units painted bright colors? 
Awesome. Very eye-catching. 
Color is a great way to set off and corral the myriad of miscellaneous garden products 
merchandised on basic fixtures. 
But the finishing touch of placing patio umbrellas over them just does it for me!
This looks planned, finished, and detailed - 
not like haphazard product shoved onto shelves at the last minute.

And really, how much 'extra' work did it take to achieve that? 
Maybe an hour to paint the shelf units, and fifteen minutes to place and open the umbrellas. 
It doesn't always take a huge effort to get a huge impact! 
HUGE ovation for the visual merchandising team at this business...they are doin' it RIGHT!

I was very impressed with not only the selection of merchandise, 
but the MANY lifestyle vignette displays that were executed with flair.

.
Skagit Valley Gardens and 'The Root Cellar Gift Shop' are located 
in Mt. Vernon, Washington (about 60 miles North of Seattle).
 

2 comments:

  1. really great to be a fly on the wall inside someone else's store. Thanks for the tour, inspiring and it has left me wanting more.

    Heidi

    ReplyDelete
  2. I love that big ol' truck with the flower bed. That's awesome!!! Neat idea just for a regular farm type yard.

    ReplyDelete

my take on retail visual design:

"The thing is, retail design is driven by psychology. It is by manipulating space, visuals, lighting, sound, smell, and mood that we influence customers to enter, stay, browse, buy, and return. It is an endless exercise in change, endurance, growth, education, and imagination that enables retailers to stay on top of their game and at the forefront of their customer's minds. Yes, what you sell IS important - but even the very best merchandise won't sell at full price if it's presented in torn boxes on dirty shelves in a store that is too crowded to turn around in. Visual impact is a huge part of business, and utilizing the principles that have been proven to work can help you build a better business." ~ DWK