Columbia Winery Interior Concept Design Final Words

This post is a continuation of the post on the final reveal of the Columbia Winery Remodel project, clarifying my part in it. The content below appeared in that post until Jan 29, 2011 when I created THIS post, and removed the content form the original one. I have dated it to appear in my blog archives immediately following the original post, for continuity.
__________________________________________________________________________
Original post edited on 6/30 to Add: Perception of words is an interesting thing. They can be easily misconstrued to mean just about anything.

Several changes to this post have been made by me, in order to stop an incorrect perception.
To clarify wording:

Changes to my original post include my use of the term 'interior design plan' - I have added the word 'concept' for clarification of what exists of my contribution. It now reads as 'interior design concept plan' so as not to imply that there were not other people who took over the design details as the project proceeded. Whomever they were, they did a great job, as I have said.

I also changed the wording of the last paragraph, adding 'and delivered to them' to clarify that I was not taking credit for the entire design. Just credit for what I created in November & December and delivered to them in December of 2008.

I deleted the line that apparently caused the most furor: 'And if I may say so, great design by moi.' Again, my original contributions are evident. That's design work. If it reads as my claiming total control, my apologies to the offended. (And consider that it's also pretty offensive on THIS side of things to be told you had nothing to do with it when you obviously DID......)

I also deleted the final sentence of the original post, that read: 'click click click click.... That's me, walking out the door after a job well done.' I guess (for some who read this post on Friday night at the event) I need to explain that one: I went there on Thursday to see the final outcome. I took photos. I felt the job in its entirety had been done splendidly and was thrilled to see the final result, and even said exactly that to three employees whom I know that were there that day. I felt all along that my contribution to this particular project was the very best I had to give this company - a company that I have always given my best to as I created displays, event decor, and other facility plans for over the past five years. I then walked out the door, happy that I had something to do with the project.

I don't know quite how this all got turned into something it isn't. But this correction, clarification, and apology to those who may have been slighted is all I can offer. It's not enough for some, I know - there is more to every story, and that is true here, as well. But from a business standpoint, I've attempted to right the record. That is all I can do this late in the game.

The perception is that I was claiming total responsibility for this project. I did not intend to imply that in anything that has been presented here, but it was perceived that way. I have said that I created the original plan and handed it over in December, and others involved in the process of the project took it from there. Because I know only the name of the contracting firm (also singularly mentioned in the company's own press release) and not the names of persons in corporate design or other trades involved, I offered a general comment that 'everyone involved' has done a great job in bringing the project vision to completion with their hard work. If this has demeaned or slighted any of those people, you have my most sincere apology.

The design style of the finished project embodies the design concept plan that I created for the company & delivered to them. This is how the design process works - it starts at one point and evolves. Just as during the two months that I was researching and creating the concept, things changed rapidly with phone calls, emails, and discoveries of new ideas to include, that also continued after I was done. Each phase brings more people into it, and although I was not involved in the entire building process, I am proud of my contributions way back in the beginning - I can see many elements, materials, fixtures, and space specifications in the final decor that are included in my design. I have also acknowledged that changes were made.

There are very few building projects that begin with one drawing and end up exactly the same - they all involve evolution and choices along the way. That does not negate the input that any one person has in the process. I said it started with my vision and went from there.... and it did. The fact that I stated my goals for the design concept I created for them is not a negative reflection on anyone, nor a claim of ownership. It says that when I was hired to design the new decor, I wanted to achieve these goals in what I did for them, and seeing the final reveal makes me proud. My name isn't on it and it never will be - I knew that when I handed over the design book in December and ending my involvement with the project. I was hired to design what the facility & decor would look like from a visual perspective, to serve as a basis for what the architect and contractor would develop. And I did that. Images of what I designed, created, and delivered to the company are shown in this post: http://decodivadebi.blogspot.com/2008/12/wine-margaritas.html

What the company did with my concept and resource materials after receiving them from me was up to them -that's the client's prerogative on any job. I've been told that because they made changes to it, I can't claim involvement in it at all. They have said that I wasn't at construction meetings, so I couldn't possibly have contributed to it. Someone called to tell me to take the photos of my design process and materials and the final rooms down from my blog. Where did THAT come from? Even the recommendation given to me by this company includes references to 'full winery design & floorplan'. (See my sidebar) They know the truth.

This post applauds the final project and the team that brought it into reality, shares my thoughts & photos of how I feel it embodies many of the elements and concepts I envisioned (indeed, I did say 95% in my Facebook post. And when I look at it, 95% of it looks like what I envisioned the whole facility would look & feel like when the project was complete. The spec sheets bear that out - see them here. The early concept drove the later choices made by others. How is that misleading or demeaning?), and says that I think Columbia Winery has a fabulous new facility. And I do.

Again, perception is everything.

This will be my last post in regard to work I have done for this company. I have promoted them freely here since the beginning of this blog, but in light of this recent treatment, I will no longer do so.

No comments:

Post a Comment

my take on retail visual design:

"The thing is, retail design is driven by psychology. It is by manipulating space, visuals, lighting, sound, smell, and mood that we influence customers to enter, stay, browse, buy, and return. It is an endless exercise in change, endurance, growth, education, and imagination that enables retailers to stay on top of their game and at the forefront of their customer's minds. Yes, what you sell IS important - but even the very best merchandise won't sell at full price if it's presented in torn boxes on dirty shelves in a store that is too crowded to turn around in. Visual impact is a huge part of business, and utilizing the principles that have been proven to work can help you build a better business." ~ DWK