Create Eyecatching Jewelry Displays with Paper!

I volunteer some of my time at a charity re-sale boutique,
where they graciously allow me to create displays in their store -
which helps them sell more of the donated product to raise money
for the many programs and services that they offer to families in need.
(find out more about Laura's House here)
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 The thing about re-sale, second-hand, thrift and consignment shops is
that EVERYTHING is basically one of a kind.
You can't mass out a display with the same item, or fill shelves with it.
And when it comes to jewelry... well, for items that are already challenging to display,
the fact that it's all 'onesies' and 'orphans' means I have to get REALLY creative.
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There are two things I've done to the jewelry display area in the store
that will work in any retail situation...

Find out what they are after the jump!


* Group items by COLOR
and
* Create a THEME for the area to tie elements together.
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I chose to use old books and book pages to create props for the jewelry,
which gives the two shelf units a cohesive style - and draws viewers closer.
The two tall shelf units offer ample space,
and so I let each shelf host a separate color of jewelry and accessories.
Bringing in a few color-coordinated handbags and scarves helped, 
as they are a larger scale than the jewelry and more visible from a distance. 
Ditto for the other props used... china, books, bowls, a pillow, etc.
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The paper, pages, and books that I used add a bit of texture and a visual 'platform' to each shelf,
making the color of the jewelry stand out:

 
Some paper is rolled up, and holds rings & bracelets.
Some paper is folded or curled, and tucked into china dishes.
Some paper is cut into shapes and taped to the back wall.
Some books are laid open, others stand up or are stacked.
I even tore the covers off of some of the books, 
and used the library card inserts on them as 'art' on the walls!

I like using books with old, aged, 'foxed' and spotted pages - 
I think they have more character.
I also like using maps, and sheet music, in similar ways.

I've used paper in displays in MANY ways in the past - 
see more here, here, here, here, here, here , here and here.

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my take on retail visual design:

"The thing is, retail design is driven by psychology. It is by manipulating space, visuals, lighting, sound, smell, and mood that we influence customers to enter, stay, browse, buy, and return. It is an endless exercise in change, endurance, growth, education, and imagination that enables retailers to stay on top of their game and at the forefront of their customer's minds. Yes, what you sell IS important - but even the very best merchandise won't sell at full price if it's presented in torn boxes on dirty shelves in a store that is too crowded to turn around in. Visual impact is a huge part of business, and utilizing the principles that have been proven to work can help you build a better business." ~ DWK